Advocacy

 

Science can inform many of the pressing issues of the day.  As a coalition of scientific societies, FABBS is eager to advance the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior, and share the contributions of research in these areas with policy makers and the public. Our advocacy efforts are broad, encompassing Congress, the Administration, and federal science agencies.

Capitol Hill Activities

FABBS tracks appropriations and (re)authorization bills through House and Senate subcommittees, committees, floor, and conference committees. We track this information for federal agencies that fund large portions of our sciences: National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and Institute of Education Sciences.

FABBS staff meet with key committee and personal staff and drafts/signs letters to express support for reasonable and sustained funding levels for science at NIH, NSF, and IES, especially the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior.

FABBS highlights the contributions of the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior through Congressional briefings, receptions, and meetings on Capitol Hill.

We connect scientists and Congressional staff so that policy makers may consider research from the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior in the development of public policies.

We issue statements or grassroots alerts to draw attention to science funding or policy issues of concern to mind, brain, and behavioral scientists.Learn more…

Science Agency Highlights

FABBS sponsors exchanges between scientists and federal agency staff to facilitate productive dialogue on scientific topics or research areas.

We share with member scientific societies agency efforts to develop/update strategic plans, and submit comments as needed.

FABBS offers public comment on regulatory issues of concern to our member society scientists, especially policies related to human research protections.

We stay abreast of agency priorities through meetings with agency staff and attendance at agency advisory committee meetings.

FABBS connects scientists and federal funding officials at our Annual Meeting. Learn more…