News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • Challenges Remain for Social/Behavioral Science as Pace of Bills Begins to Slow: Scientists Urged to Get Involved »
    With much enthusiasm, House and Senate Appropriations leaders began the calendar year with hopes to pass all twelve spending bills. On the heels of the Bipartisan Budget Act, it appeared that it might be possible. Now, with three months left before the next fiscal year begins, amendments to the spending bills are getting in the way.

    In the Senate, several spending bills made their way through the Committee, and were packaged as a minibus bill for the Senate floor. One of those bills, the Commerce-Justice-Science (CJS) Appropriations bill, provided a small increase of 1.16% for NSF and passed through Committee in bipartisan fashion with no threats to social and behavioral sciences. In anticipation of harmful amendments on the Senate floor, FABBS issued an Action Alert urging Senators to vote against any amendments that singled out areas of science for cuts. Late last week, the package of three spending bills was pulled from the Senate floor because no agreement could be reached on how to handle amendments to the bill.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Elke Weber »
    Elke Weber is the Jerome A. Chazen Professor of International Business in the Management Division of Columbia Business School and a professor of Psychology at Columbia University. She also founded and co-directs two centers at Columbia, the Center for the Decision Sciences and the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions.
  • Neuropsychology Fellow Quiroz Presented with Early Career Award »
    For Yakeel T. Quiroz, recent winner of the FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award, finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease is more than a career and quest for knowledge. “Once you get to work with families affected by Alzheimer’s disease, get to know them, it’s hard to leave them,” says Quiroz, a clinical/research fellow in neuropsychology at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston. Quiroz explains that once there is clinical presentation, and dementia sets in, the progression of familial Alzheimer’s is similar to that of the sporadic. Understanding the familial, she explains, may offer clues for treating both types of Alzheimer’s. “We’re trying to get a better sense of what’s going on in the pre-clinical phase,” she says.
  • One Battle Down, One to Go on NSF Appropriations »
    We have one more round to go before NSF appropriations is complete, and your voice counts! During the week of June 16, the U.S. Senate is expected to vote on the FY 2015 CJS Appropriations bill. As on the House side, we anticipate amendments to be offered that may target the social and behavioral sciences (SBS) and/or specific SBS disciplines by reducing funding or placing restrictions on it. Write your Senators now to encourage support for NSF and opposition to any amendment that singles out any area of science for negative treatment.
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences Survive Cut in House Spending Bill, But Cut 42% in NSF Reauthorization Plan »
    There was a flurry of activity last week on two major bills addressing science. On the House floor, Members debated the Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) Appropriations bill that funds the National Science Foundation (NSF).
  • NSF Clarifies Policy on Award Abstracts and Titles »
    On May 29, 2014 the National Science Foundation issued an Important Notice to Presidents of Universities and Colleges and Heads of Other National Science Foundation Awardee Organizations. An NSF notice in December announced a focus on transparency and accountability (IN-135), one piece of which is "improving public understanding of our funding decisions through our award Abstracts and Titles." In this vein, the current announcement clarifies the NSF policy on award Abstracts and Titles.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Joel S. Warm »
    Professor Warm joined the faculty of the University of Cincinnati shortly after receiving his doctorate in experimental psychology from the University of Alabama in 1966 and completing post-doctoral training in human factors under the direction of Earl Alluisi at the University of Louisville. Currently, he is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati, Senior Scientist at the Warfighter Interface Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and Distinguished Researcher in the Human Factors Group of the University of Dayton Research Institute.
  • Behavioral Pharmacologist Johnson Presented with Early Career Impact Award »
    We all know we're supposed to make choices that are good for our long-term health, although that's not easy when we're faced with things that bring us pleasure right now. But for some people, the short-term benefits often win out over the long-term ones. That can help explain why some people get addicted to drug use and other risky behaviors – and why it's so hard to get them to stop, according to FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award winner Matthew Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
  • Act Now to Protect Social and Behavioral Sciences Funding at NSF! »
    The U.S. House of Representatives will begin debating H.R. 4660 on Wed., May 28, 2014. Known as FY 2015 Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill, it funds many of the nation’s science programs, including the National Science Foundation.

    Scientists MUST let their elected officials know that investments in NSF research, including social and behavioral sciences and education research, are an important foundation for advancing knowledge relevant to the nation.

  • Senate Turns Attention to #InnovationDeficit »
    With the squeeze on the federal budget and some calls to cut spending even further, it is a welcome reprieve for the Senate to highlight the need to address the nation’s innovation deficit.
  • Leadership Changes at OBSSR »
    The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research recently announced that as of May 5, 2014, Dr. Robert M. Kaplan, Associate Director for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and Director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), will be moving to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Dr. Kaplan's new position as Chief Science Officer for the AHRQ comes after 35+ years of association with the AHRQ.
  • NIH Data Book Tool Enhanced with Peer Review Feature »
    The NIH Data Book (NDB), which provides information on extramural grants and contract awards; grant applications; organizations, trainees, and fellows supported through NIH programs; and the national biomedical workforce; has been enhanced with the addition of the new “NIH Peer Review” feature.
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