News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • Science Caught in Committee Battle with NSF »
    For the past year and half, the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, under the leadership of Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) has been leading the push to change how NSF does business. Although in years past, Members of Congress have periodically focused on individual scientific awards, this battle has a different feel. It is being led by the Chair of the House Science Committee, a committee that has historically worked in bipartisan fashion to craft bills that are supported by the broad science community.
  • Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences (PIBBS) Annual Launches »
    The Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS) and SAGE will soon publish the inaugural issue of Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences (PIBBS). This annual journal features research findings in the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior that are applicable to nearly every area of public policy. The first issue comprises 33 articles in social and personality psychology focused on topics including health, education, justice, the environment, and inequality. Subsequent annual issues will include policy relevant research in other areas behavioral and brain sciences represented by FABBS member societies.
  • Psychologist Burt Presented with Early Career Award »
    Why do some kids lie or shoplift and not others? Is it the neighborhood? The influences of friends, parents or siblings? Other environmental triggers? Associate Professor of Psychology S. Alexandra Burt, of Michigan State University and winner of the 2014 FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award from the Society for Research in Psychopathology, is studying how the environment may activate or deactivate genetic and biological risk factors related to behavior. It’s not nature vs. nurture, she explained. “It’s nature via nurture—how the two work together.” Learn more in "Nature Via Nurture and the Origin of Bad Behavior" »
  • Social Psychologist Kross Presented with Early Career Award »
    Events happen in our lives that challenge our emotions, causing us to be angry, anxious or even depressed. Our attempts to console ourselves after a bad experience can backfire. “We start spinning and ruminating, and we end up replaying those negative experiences over and over in ways that don’t get us anywhere,” said Ethan Kross, an assistant professor of social psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and winner of the FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. Kross, who is director of Michigan’s Self-Control and Emotion Laboratory, draws on multiple disciplines of psychology to explore how people can improve emotional self-control in their daily lives. Learn more in "Language and Well Being" »
  • Government Funded for Ten Weeks: Spending Battles Shift to Post-Election »
    With just over six weeks until the mid-term elections, the U.S. House and Senate passed a “stopgap” spending bill to keep the government operating beyond September 30th. The President signed the bill on Friday.

    The Continuing Resolution (CR) funds government programs through December 11th. Funding for the 10-week period is set at FY 2014 levels minus a small across-the-board cut to provide funds to train and equip moderate Syrian rebels to fight the terror group ISIS.

  • IES Reauthorization One Step Closer to Becoming Law »
    The Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, under the leadership of Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Ranking Member Lamar Alexander (R-TN), favorably reported a bill to reauthorize the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the research arm of the Department of Education. The bill made modest changes to the House-passed version known as the Strengthening Education through Research Act (SETRA).
  • Proudfit Presented with Early Career Impact Award »
    Most people don't like to make mistakes, but some people are more sensitive to errors than others, and that can make them more prone to anxiety, according to Greg Hajcak Proudfit, associate professor of psychology at Stony Brook University and FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award winner from the Society for Psychophysiological Research. Proudfit's research on how people’s brains process mistakes is helping to identify who is at risk for anxiety and even to suggest new avenues for treatment of anxiety and related disorders. Learn more in When Mistakes are a Threat to Mental Health
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences Finding Support on Capitol Hill »
    The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee is expected to release this week the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2014, its bill to reauthorize programs at the National Science Foundation and other federal science agencies. FABBS has been discussing the bill with Committee staff over the past 10 months, and the new bill is a solid endorsement of NSF and the full range of research it supports.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors James J. Jenkins »
    James J. Jenkins, fondly known as J3, was one of a group of World War II era psychologists who changed psychology. He began as an I-O psychologist at the University of Minnesota, but was drawn to more experimental endeavors. Jenkins helped to foster psychology's "cognitive revolution." His role in this started with the Social Science Research Council's 1953 summer research conference that helped establish psycholinguistics as a discipline. Then in 1964-65 as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Jenkins became convinced that the concepts of the "mediation theory" of language that he had been promoting would not suffice to explain language development and that a different conception of "how the head works" (a favorite phrase) had to be found. He was flexible in his approaches, always trying to solve the problem rather than advance a particular theory. His work advanced multiple research areas: learning, memory, sentence processing, aphasia, speech perception, and perceptual organization.
  • Deputy Director Cora Marrett to Leave NSF »
    Dr. Cora B. Marrett, Deputy Director of NSF, announced on July 18, 2014 that she will be stepping down from her position effective August 24, 2014. Marrett was confirmed as NSF Deputy Director in 2011 and has also served as NSF's acting director and acting deputy director. Marrett served as the first assistant director for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences directorate, and as assistant director for the Education and Human Resources directorate.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Alice F. Healy »
    Alice F. Healy has been an outstanding researcher, editor, teacher, collaborator, and colleague for over four decades. Healy is College Professor of Distinction and Director of the Center for Research on Training at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She received her bachelor’s degree from Vassar and her doctoral degree in psychology from The Rockefeller University. After several years as assistant and associate professor at Yale, she joined the faculty at University of Colorado where she has been recognized with all three of the department’s faculty awards for research, teaching, and service.
  • Cognitive Psychologist Tom Griffiths Presented with Early Career Impact Award »
    Dr. Thomas Griffiths was presented with the FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award at the Cognitive Science Society annual meeting in July 2014 in Quebec City, Canada. Read more about his work in Giving Computers the Wisdom of People.
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