News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • Our Scientists at Work: Researchers Seek Early Markers of Schizophrenia, With Remediation in Mind »
    Although researchers know that genetics plays a role in the development of schizophrenia, brain scientists are exploring what they think are early markers of schizophrenia; that is, impairments in cognition and in brain function. Psychologist Deanna Barch explains how these markers could help identify people who are most at risk for developing the disease and how exercising the brain may help those already diagnosed with schizophrenia, or even those in high-risk populations, head off the disease.
  • Our Scientists at Work: Researchers Searching for Ways to Prevent Mysterious Form of Dementia »
    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE, is a neurodegenerative disease set in motion by a history of repetitive brain trauma, such as concussions and subconcussive blows that occur early in life. To date, scientists know relatively little about the disease. But what is known is that CTE is a progressive brain disorder similar to Alzheimer’s and other related neurodegenerative diseases. Neuropsychologist Robert Stern studies CTE and reveals what he and his collaborators are learning from their research.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Harry C. Triandis »
    Harry C. Triandis is professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A pioneer in the study of cross-cultural psychology, Triandis’ research has focused on the cognitive aspects of attitudes, norms, roles, and values across cultures.
  • Our Scientists at Work: When Cognitive Decline Comes Up In Conversation »
    Meaningful conversation hinges not just on the words or ideas we string together to explain ourselves and the world, it also hinges on our awareness of whom we’re speaking with. But as we enter old age, our conversational capability declines. Cognitive psychologist William Horton, PhD, discusses how the drive to communicate fares in the face of cognitive decline.
  • Our Scientists at Work: Listen Up: That Birdsong You’re Enjoying Is Courtesy of Estrogens »
    Estrogens are often thought of as a female hormone, but that concept is incomplete. It’s true that estrogens are produced in the ovaries, but they’re also produced in the adrenal glands, liver, and the brain, in both males and females. Estrogens produced in songbirds’ brains may help them learn to sing and respond to song. Luke Remage-Healey, a behavioral physiologist, strongly suspects that estrogens can enhance learning-related cognitive functions, including singing.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Thomas S. Wallsten »
    Thomas S. (Tom) Wallsten is a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland-College Park and affiliated with both the campus’s Center for Advanced Study of Language and the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science. His research focuses primarily on topics in behavioral decision theory, including judgment, analysis, choice, probabilistic inference, risk assessment and risk communication.
  • Edging Closer to the Cliff »
    With ten days to go (including the holidays) before the country heads over the fiscal cliff, the President and Congress still have a small window to agree on a bipartisan solution to avert it. Although the President and Speaker had been inching closer – only $200 billion apart in revenue and $70 billion in spending cuts – there is still no deal on the table. To some in both parties, going over the fiscal cliff may be a better solution than giving away too much in the negotiations.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Thomas K. Landauer »
    Tom Landauer received his degree at Harvard University in 1960 and has taken positions at Harvard University, Dartmouth College, Stanford University, Princeton University, and University of Colorado. His work has contributed to our understanding of broad issues and implications of human-computer interaction.
  • NIH Director Recognizes Former Senator Specter’s Support for Medical Research »
    A tireless supporter of NIH research, former Senator Arlen Specter, died on October 14, 2012. NIH Director Francis Collins recognized Specter’s leadership in pushing for federal support for NIH research, which many scientists and science advocates recall him saying was the “crown jewel of the federal government.”
  • Scientists Prepare for District Science Advocacy Week »
    In a joint partnership effort, FABBS joined forces with its largest member society, the American Psychological Association, to organize a science advocacy training webinar. The goal was to prepare scientists to visit their Member of Congress back home in the district and lend their voices in support of science funding.
  • Congress Postpones Tough Decisions on Federal Budget While Sequestration Looms »
    Trying to avert a government shutdown before the elections, Congress passed a Continuing Resolution (CR) that will keep the federal government operating through March 27, 2013. The funding level for federal programs in the final 6 months of FY 2013 is uncertain, but the balance of power following the elections will undoubtedly influence the direction and whether significant cuts will be required or funding remains at levels set in the Budget Control Act.
  • Calling All Scientists: FABBS and APA to Organize District Science Advocacy Week »
    FABBS and its largest member society, the American Psychological Association, are joining forces to train interested scientists in preparing for and conducting a visit with their member of Congress. The visits are intended to highlight why federal investments in our sciences are important for individuals, society, and the nation.