News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • FABBS Foundation Honors Thomas K. Landauer »
    Tom Landauer received his degree at Harvard University in 1960 and has taken positions at Harvard University, Dartmouth College, Stanford University, Princeton University, and University of Colorado. His work has contributed to our understanding of broad issues and implications of human-computer interaction.
  • NIH Director Recognizes Former Senator Specter’s Support for Medical Research »
    A tireless supporter of NIH research, former Senator Arlen Specter, died on October 14, 2012. NIH Director Francis Collins recognized Specter’s leadership in pushing for federal support for NIH research, which many scientists and science advocates recall him saying was the “crown jewel of the federal government.”
  • NSF Seeks Proposals for Interdisciplinary Research across the SBE Sciences »
    Growing out of the SBE 2020 visioning report, Rebuilding the Mosaic, NSF is seeking proposals for research that involves investigators from multiple disciplinary fields, integrates theoretical approaches and methodologies from multiple fields, and is likely to yield generalizable insights and information that will advance basic knowledge and capabilities across multiple fields.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors John D. Bransford »
    John D. Bransford is a highly innovative contributor to the field of human cognition, especially with respect to our understanding of human learning and the design of technology-enhanced learning environments.
  • Graduate Students Speaking Out on Sequestration: Join the Effort! »
    The American Physical Society (APS Physics) is spearheading an effort to let U.S. House and Senate leaders know about graduate student concerns with automatic cuts to the federal budget scheduled to begin on Jan. 2, 2012.
  • Our Scientists at Work: Researchers Seek Early Markers of Schizophrenia, With Remediation in Mind »
    Although researchers know that genetics plays a role in the development of schizophrenia, brain scientists are exploring what they think are early markers of schizophrenia; that is, impairments in cognition and in brain function. Psychologist Deanna Barch explains how these markers could help identify people who are most at risk for developing the disease and how exercising the brain may help those already diagnosed with schizophrenia, or even those in high-risk populations, head off the disease.
  • National Research Council Highlights Behavioral and Social Sciences in Action »
    The National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) of The National Academies held a symposium, Social and Behavioral Sciences in Action, on September 24, 2012, with a focus on national security, medicine, and engineering.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Carolyn Rovee-Collier »
    Carolyn Rovee-Collier was born on April 7, 1942 in Nashville, TN, the daughter of a Distinguished Professor of comparative anatomy and textbook author who inculcated in her a love of science, teaching, writing, and scholarship. Carolyn’s systematic studies of infant learning and memory have had a major and broad impact on the understanding of cognitive processes during early development.
  • MINERVA Research Competition for 2013 Opens »
    The MINERVA Research Initiative is a university-based basic social science research program launched by the Department of Defense in 2008. The goal is to improve the “fundamental understanding of the social, cultural, behavioral, and political forces that shape regions of the world of strategic importance to the U.S.” Proposals are sought from single investigators as well as multidisciplinary and multi-institution teams.
  • Science Societies Highlight NSF-Funded Research on Capitol Hill »
    The Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF) sponsored the 18th Annual Exhibition and Reception on Capitol Hill to highlight the excellent research funded by the National Science Foundation. Over thirty scientific societies, universities, and science organizations participated in the event, STEM Research and Education: Underpinning American Innovation, on May 15, 2012.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Beth Sulzer-Azaroff »
    Dr. Beth Sulzer-Azaroff is internationally recognized for her pioneering work in applied behavior analysis. She is perhaps most recognized for the development of strategies to enhance learning and quality of life for individuals with developmental disabilities. Through her research, teaching, textbooks and the work of her academic progeny she has improved the lives of children, adults, families and workers throughout the world.
  • New Research By James Coan Takes “A Fresh Look at Our Selves” »
    The brain’s capacity to make that distinction [between self and others] may not be clear-cut—especially when it comes to threatening situations involving someone we care about, says James Coan, a psychological scientist who specializes in the neuroscience of emotional expression.