News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • Our Scientists at Work: How Watching the Clock Affects Performance »
    Where we focus our attention affects how we perceive the passage of time. Pay attention to a task at hand, and time flies. Pay attention to the passage of time, and things seem to slow. Cognitive psychologist Joseph Magliano explains why.
  • Next Steps for Behavioral and Social Sciences in K-12 STEM Education »
    Drawing upon the National Research Council’s (NRC) Framework for K-12 Science Education, ACHIEVE began its work to create a set of common science standards. The Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences joined with the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and Society for Research in Child Development to provide input as primary reviewers to the draft science standards report.
  • Philip Rubin Takes New Leadership Role at White House Office »
    Dr. John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), recently appointed Dr. Philip Rubin to the position of Principal Assistant Director for Science at OSTP.
  • Science Societies Highlight NSF-Funded Research on Capitol Hill »
    The Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF) sponsored the 18th Annual Exhibition and Reception on Capitol Hill to highlight the excellent research funded by the National Science Foundation. Over thirty scientific societies, universities, and science organizations participated in the event, STEM Research and Education: Underpinning American Innovation, on May 15, 2012.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Beth Sulzer-Azaroff »
    Dr. Beth Sulzer-Azaroff is internationally recognized for her pioneering work in applied behavior analysis. She is perhaps most recognized for the development of strategies to enhance learning and quality of life for individuals with developmental disabilities. Through her research, teaching, textbooks and the work of her academic progeny she has improved the lives of children, adults, families and workers throughout the world.
  • New Research By James Coan Takes “A Fresh Look at Our Selves” »
    The brain’s capacity to make that distinction [between self and others] may not be clear-cut—especially when it comes to threatening situations involving someone we care about, says James Coan, a psychological scientist who specializes in the neuroscience of emotional expression.
  • Capitol Hill Update and the “Devastating” Impact of Sequestration »
    In what is typically a busy appropriations time of the year, add to it a great deal of discussion about the upcoming sequestration set to begin in January 2013. The sequestration was put into motion with the Budget Control Act (BCA), signed into law in 2011 following negotiations between Congress and the President over the debt ceiling and deficits. Sequestration provides for automatic cuts of an estimated 8-10 percent to the domestic, discretionary part of the federal budget–meaning to agencies that fund much of the nation’s scientific research.
  • Interagency Working Group on Neuroscience Forms »
    With the enthusiastic support of the Administration, Congress and numerous scientific societies, the National Science and Technology Council’s Interagency Working Group on Neuroscience is taking shape. The NSTC working group will coordinate activities in neuroscience research across the federal government and will include several U.S. departments in its membership.
  • Calling All Scientists: FABBS and APA to Organize District Science Advocacy Week »
    FABBS and its largest member society, the American Psychological Association, are joining forces to train interested scientists in preparing for and conducting a visit with their member of Congress. The visits are intended to highlight why federal investments in our sciences are important for individuals, society, and the nation.
  • Pre-election Spending Battles Continue on Capitol Hill »
    As Congress nears its August recess and with few days left in the legislative calendar before the November elections, it appears once again that a Continuing Resolution (CR) will be needed to fund the government as it moves into the new fiscal year. With an upcoming election, lawmakers want to avoid a government shutdown and postpone the rest of the battles over spending cuts.
  • Our Scientists at Work: The Psychology Behind Going Green »
    We have habits, fears, and biases that get in the way of making all sorts of sound decisions, even when it comes to going green. Psychologist Elke Weber sheds light on why we make the decisions we do, especially when they’re not necessarily in our best interest.
  • Going Straight to the Source: How do infants learn best? »
    Infants are now exposed to more information from more sources than ever before, whether it’s books, TVs, or computers. Developmental psychologist Rachel Barr, discusses how well infants learn from select sources of information compared with how well they learn from face-to-face interactions.