News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • FABBS Foundation Honors Thomas S. Wallsten »
    Thomas S. (Tom) Wallsten is a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland-College Park and affiliated with both the campus’s Center for Advanced Study of Language and the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science. His research focuses primarily on topics in behavioral decision theory, including judgment, analysis, choice, probabilistic inference, risk assessment and risk communication.
  • IES Reauthorization One Step Closer to Becoming Law »
    The Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, under the leadership of Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Ranking Member Lamar Alexander (R-TN), favorably reported a bill to reauthorize the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the research arm of the Department of Education. The bill made modest changes to the House-passed version known as the Strengthening Education through Research Act (SETRA).
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Lawrence Erlbaum »
    Lawrence Erlbaum is unique in both publishing and psychological science. As the founder of his own publishing company, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Erlbaum is known for his business savvy and his dedication to disseminating academic research. His interest in psychological science and focus on making academic research available has made him a legendary figure and a respected friend to many scientists.
  • Edging Closer to the Cliff »
    With ten days to go (including the holidays) before the country heads over the fiscal cliff, the President and Congress still have a small window to agree on a bipartisan solution to avert it. Although the President and Speaker had been inching closer – only $200 billion apart in revenue and $70 billion in spending cuts – there is still no deal on the table. To some in both parties, going over the fiscal cliff may be a better solution than giving away too much in the negotiations.
  • FABBS Foundation Announces 2015 Early Career Impact Award Winners »
    The FABBS Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 Early Career Impact Award. This award recognizes early career scientists of FABBS member societies who have made major contributions to the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior. Now in our third year, we are honoring eight outstanding scientists representing a broad array of research. The scientists will receive the award at their nominating society’s 2015 Annual Meeting or another high visibility venue. In addition, FABBS Foundation will work with the winners to disseminate their work to a public audience through our science writing program.
  • Attention Focuses on Avoiding the Fiscal Cliff »
    With the signing of the Sequestration Transparency Act, the Administration signaled its agreement to prepare a detailed plan for Congress regarding how automatic cuts to defense and non-defense programs would be impacted. The plan must be submitted to Congress within 30 days, just days after the Labor Day holiday.
  • DBASSE to Hold NSF-Funded Workshop on Human Subjects Regulations »
    The National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education launched a fast-track project to examine proposed revisions to the “Common Rule”– the most extensive changes offered since 1991– in relation to research in the behavioral and social sciences.
  • Proudfit Presented with Early Career Impact Award »
    Most people don't like to make mistakes, but some people are more sensitive to errors than others, and that can make them more prone to anxiety, according to Greg Hajcak Proudfit, associate professor of psychology at Stony Brook University and FABBS Foundation Early Career Impact Award winner from the Society for Psychophysiological Research. Proudfit's research on how people’s brains process mistakes is helping to identify who is at risk for anxiety and even to suggest new avenues for treatment of anxiety and related disorders. Learn more in When Mistakes are a Threat to Mental Health
  • MINERVA Research Competition for 2013 Opens »
    The MINERVA Research Initiative is a university-based basic social science research program launched by the Department of Defense in 2008. The goal is to improve the “fundamental understanding of the social, cultural, behavioral, and political forces that shape regions of the world of strategic importance to the U.S.” Proposals are sought from single investigators as well as multidisciplinary and multi-institution teams.
  • Road Ahead Still Uncertain »
    Coming into the new year, the White House and Congress averted one major issue in the ongoing fiscal cliff debates, what to do about expiring tax cuts. With this aside, several other significant fiscal issues remain: sequestration, federal debt limit, and funding for the federal government operations.
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences Finding Support on Capitol Hill »
    The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee is expected to release this week the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2014, its bill to reauthorize programs at the National Science Foundation and other federal science agencies. FABBS has been discussing the bill with Committee staff over the past 10 months, and the new bill is a solid endorsement of NSF and the full range of research it supports.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Carolyn Rovee-Collier »
    Carolyn Rovee-Collier was born on April 7, 1942 in Nashville, TN, the daughter of a Distinguished Professor of comparative anatomy and textbook author who inculcated in her a love of science, teaching, writing, and scholarship. Carolyn’s systematic studies of infant learning and memory have had a major and broad impact on the understanding of cognitive processes during early development.