News Archive

News from FABBS and the FABBS Foundation

  • Edging Closer to the Cliff »
    With ten days to go (including the holidays) before the country heads over the fiscal cliff, the President and Congress still have a small window to agree on a bipartisan solution to avert it. Although the President and Speaker had been inching closer – only $200 billion apart in revenue and $70 billion in spending cuts – there is still no deal on the table. To some in both parties, going over the fiscal cliff may be a better solution than giving away too much in the negotiations.
  • Our Scientists at Work: Listen Up: That Birdsong You’re Enjoying Is Courtesy of Estrogens »
    Estrogens are often thought of as a female hormone, but that concept is incomplete. It’s true that estrogens are produced in the ovaries, but they’re also produced in the adrenal glands, liver, and the brain, in both males and females. Estrogens produced in songbirds’ brains may help them learn to sing and respond to song. Luke Remage-Healey, a behavioral physiologist, strongly suspects that estrogens can enhance learning-related cognitive functions, including singing.
  • FABBS and FABBS Foundation Presidents to Launch New Initiatives »
    Robert Sternberg and Art Graesser, Presidents of FABBS and the FABBS Foundation respectively, are launching new initiatives during their 2012-2014 terms. The focus will be on building communication channels that advance the missions of our member societies through the FABBS advocacy efforts and FABBS Foundation education activities.
  • FABBS Foundation Brings Psychological Science to Kids »
    The FABBS Foundation and Howard University joined together at the 2012 USA Science and Engineering Festival to show how psychological scientists study ostracism, and why it’s important to learn about it.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Daniel Wegner »
    Daniel Wegner, PhD (Harvard University) is now featured in the FABBS Foundation's "In Honor of..." program which honors eminent, senior scientists.
  • The Brains behind a Better Robot for Seniors: Scientists and Engineers »
    Human factors psychologist Wendy Rogers is working with a team of researchers to design a robot that helps older adults retain their independence while maintaining their quality of life.
  • Our Scientists at Work: How Our Emotions Shape Moral Hypocrisy »
    Moral hypocrisy, the tendency to judge others more harshly than we judge ourselves, has been studied by researchers before now--but only through the lens of disgust. FABBS Foundation Science Writer Robin Tricoles talks with Dr. Evan Polman and graduate student Rachel Ruttan about moral hypocrisy as it relates to three emotions: anger, guilt, and envy.
  • U.S. House Votes to Defund Political Science Research at NSF »
    On May 10th, the U.S. House of Representatives debated the Commerce-Justice-Science Appropriations bill on the House floor and voted 218-208 to eliminate funding for political science research funded by the National Science Foundation. Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) introduced the amendment stating that it was “oriented toward ensuring, at the least, that the NSF does not waste taxpayer dollars on a meritless program.”
  • Draft Report on Next Generation Science Standards Released »
    The National Research Council’s Framework for K-12 Science Education, released in mid-2011, created a starting point for the development of science standards. As the report was published, the nonprofit ACHIEVE began its work to draft a common set of science standards for K-12 education that could be used to build curricula and assessments.
  • Our Scientists at Work: Game for Some Physics? »
    Learning-scientist Douglas Clark's aim is to teach us to reinterpret our daily experiences in ways that will support our formal understanding of scientific concepts. So, he and his colleagues develop games that help people integrate their intuitive understanding of basic science with a more formal one.
  • FABBS Foundation Honors Jim Sidanius »
    Jim Sidanius is a Professor in the departments of Psychology and African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His primary research interests include the interface between political ideology and cognitive functioning, the political psychology of gender, group conflict, institutional discrimination, and the evolutionary psychology of intergroup prejudice.
  • Our Scientists at Work: How Watching the Clock Affects Performance »
    Where we focus our attention affects how we perceive the passage of time. Pay attention to a task at hand, and time flies. Pay attention to the passage of time, and things seem to slow. Cognitive psychologist Joseph Magliano explains why.